Drobo

Just a friendly reminder... Backups are important!

This is a massive case of FAIL!

http://www.techcrunch.com/2009/10/10/t-mobile-sidekick-disaster-microsofts-servers-crashed-and-they-dont-have-a-backup/

If you are on a Mac and use a Drobo/DroboShare, setup TimeMachine ASAP. BackMyFruitUp is here to help.

http://backmyfruitup.googlecode.com/

-latchkey

I saw that too - ouch… Even the cloud needs a backup. Just like you have a spare housekey, you should have a backup of any data that you wouldn’t/couldn’t want to lose.

Fault-tolerance is not a substitute for backup! They should go hand-in-hand… FT doesn’t save you from stupid - or angry Murphy. :slight_smile:

Lesson: don’t consider “cloud backups” as a primary, reliable way to protect stuff. Maybe there are leading providers to trust? WTF would anyone trust a Microsoft named “Danger”. Isn’t it clear they are daring you to test their veracity or – ow do I say this – their “fuck you’ness” with a crappy service.

Clouds are crap. Protect yourself. DOn’t believe the hype. Even Google has serious outages from time to time. Clouds are crap.

Repeat after me - Clouds are crap.

I’m new to the Forum and can’t find much reference to Backing up a Drobo off site.

Can anyone make any suggestions? We use a Drobo as our main Data location for a network of 6 or 7 Macs with one PC. We run Mac OS X Server on a MacMini with the Drobo connected to that. We have been doing daily tape back ups but the tape machine seems faulty so we are looking to replace it with a suitable alternative.

Brian, I am extremely satisfied with SyncBackPro for my (office) Windows client, backing up to a locally connected Drobo, and also to an offsite Drobo connected via my home Mac Mini. The transfer is encrypted, via SFTP, and the interface is smooth and slick.

The only drawback is that the resulting files are not encrypted, and since they are connected to a server (the Mac Mini), that concerns me, even with the firewall enabled.

For local Mac backups, I’m using ChronoSync, which is adequate but not in the same class as SyncBackPro.

Finally, I am currently evaluating CrashPlan+. If has the significant advantage of working cross platform (it is written in Java).

In addition, the files are both transmitted and stored in encrypted form. Unfortunately, the encryption is BlowFish, rather than an evaluated national standard such as AES. And the key is derived from a password, instead of a decent software random number generator, much less a hardware RNG. And the fact that the files are encrypted is fine, but the fact that the file names are also encrypted makes it harder to figure out what is stored, and how to manage it. That that’s rather a mixed blessing.

The biggest problem is that the performance over the Internet is painfully slow. My Internet downlink speed is somewhere around 16-20 Mbps, but my uplink speed is about 2 Mbps. That’s about 270KB/sec, and that means that a 20GB file takes an eternity. And the Internet speed at work is even worse – a T1 line that is shared with other users.

Finally, CrashPlan+ sometimes crashes, and at other times refuses to connect to the backup engine, forcing a reboot (like right now).

All in all, less than perfect, but better than a poke in the eye with a rusty stick, as my dad used to say.

@Suiteb, can’t you develop a way to sync locally instead of over the WAN pipe?

Switcher, I should have been more specific. Yes, of course I could sync locally, using a mapped drive, and that is certainly what would normally be recommended.

But it is difficult to be at two places at the same time, and if something goes wrong when syncing from the office, or on the road, I have no easy way to see what is going on at the other end. This approach allows me to be reasonably sure that things are going to work smoothly – assuming they do.

I can wade in about CP. I have CP+ installed on Mac OS X, Vista, XP, XP 64 and Win 7. All are backing up to an offsite family plan for $180 for 3 years. Unlimited computers and unlimited data. I’ve uploaded over 350 GBs so far.

CP encrypts at 128 bit and CP+ encrypts at 448 bit. The key can be derived from the password or you can have a separate password and key.

The nice thing about CP is it is completely free.

CP also advertises that they verify backups every night

One more thing… How does a stick get rusty? :slight_smile: